Clean Interviewing at Work

Photo by Alex on Unsplash

At work, I need to talk to people at work to understand their perspectives on how the organization functions. A large University is similar to a small town. We have lots of buildings and green space, a lake, car parks roads and buildings. And security guards. And lots of people trying to achieve their goals in different ways. We’ve campuses in the UK and Asia too, links to a large teaching hospital and our own Arts Theatre. We’re complex.

I’m collecting information for User Journeys for people working, studying teaching and researching. If we help these people reach their goals, the University reaches it’s goals too. We’re structurally coupled to their success. The success of students, staff, and faculty is the success of the University.

An example of a user journey is below. We can see how someone experiences traveling with Lego.

To collect information I’m talking to people using ideas from Clean Interviewing. My goal is to find out what people think using their own words. I’d like them to see the maps I build and recognize their journeys. By accurately reflecting their perspective I hope that they’ll advocate for the use of the maps.

In almost all aspects the conversations I have are normal. I’d not expect the person I’m talking to notice anything unusual. There really isn’t anything weird or unusual. Apart from the questions are usually of the following form, and use the exact words used. I don’t paraphrase.

A selection of the questions I use are:

  • What needs to happen here?
  • What is it called?
  • Is there anything else about <that>?
  • What happens before <that>?
  • Is there anything else that needs to be here, but isn’t?
  • What happens next?
  • Overall, is there anything missing?

What I’m doing is using a framework to develop a model of what things are, what they are called, and what needs to happen before and afterward. It’s a normal conversation, and every part doesn’t follow these rules. If there is something I’d need to find out, I’ll use a clean question.

These are really simple questions suitable for situations where I could assume that I knew what the words used meant, and what happened was the same as the other interviews I’d done. By removing the assumptions I believe I get better information.

Clean Interviewing is based on the work of David Grove, modeled by James Lawley and Penny Tomkins.  More details, including use in academic research settings, are on the Wikipedia entry. This blog post shows a very simple use of Clean Language Interviewing.

To learn more about Clean Interviewing there are events on https://cleanlearning.co.uk/events

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3 thoughts on “Clean Interviewing at Work

  1. Richard

    > I’d not expect the person I’m talking to notice anything unusual.

    If that’s the person’s “normal” how do they know it’s unusual? Let’s not go down “is there anything else about that normal?” just for now 😉

    Who judges what – from an experience point of view – is unusual? Is it you, the interviewee, or the person(s) who put the process together?

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    1. Richard

      Gah. Fingers faster than my brain 🙂

      It should be: If that person’s experience is considered “normal”, how….

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    2. make10louder Post author

      Anything that doesn’t feel like a flowing conversation is unusual. I’ve had plenty of previous experience where people feel the Clean Questions are a bit ‘odd’. With this set of interviews, there were no awkward moments where the questions and answers didn’t flow. So there was no noticable difference between parts of the conversation.

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